RSS

Category Archives: Portraiture

Common Photography Posing Mistakes and Fixes | I Heart Faces

This week is all about posing! Posing can be stressful and sometimes overwhelming when you have so many other things to worry about at a shoot…equipment, camera settings, lighting, and communicating with the client. Amongst all of that, it is your job to come up with posing that is both flattering and creative for your client/subject. By learning and practicing the basic elements of posing and making those second nature, you can then focus on more fun and creative posing.

Photography Posing Mistakes and How to Fix Them

Let’s discuss 12 tips for avoiding some common posing mistakes. The tips on women can be applied to brides, high school seniors, models, and moms. The guy tips are universal for men, high school seniors, and models.

Women Mistake #1 – Neck creases

The Fix – It doesn’t matter how thin or not thin a woman is. It doesn’t matter how old or not old she is. If her body is turned away from you and she is turning her head to look over her shoulder at you, it is very likely she will have a nice set of neck creases. Neck creases/wrinkles may not bother some photographers, but they bother me, and they will most likely bother your client. There are a couple easy fixes. You can 1) tell her to turn her upper body and shoulder (the one closest to you) more towards you so that it opens up that area and minimizes the creases, 2) adjust your shooting position more to the side of her, rather than directly behind her so that she doesn’t have to crank her head so far to see your camera, or 3) use her hair to strategically hide the creases.

Read More at Common Photography Posing Mistakes and Fixes | I Heart Faces.

Advertisements
 
Comments Off on Common Photography Posing Mistakes and Fixes | I Heart Faces

Posted by on June 27, 2012 in Portraiture, Technique, Tutes & Tips, Worth a Look

 

Tags: ,

Standing Posing Guide

Posing can be a stressful task. You have a million things going through your mind during a photoshoot: light, camera settings, interacting with the client. Then you have to come up with interesting and flattering poses for each and every shot! Yikes!

Or, posing can be easy. True story! You don’t have to stress. You don’t have to worry. You don’t have to memorize a million poses. You don’t even have to change things up that much to get variety!

The key to stress free posing is to make small adjustments in order to get a LOT of variety from one simple setup. Yep, it’s that easy. Tweak things a little, engage the couple, get them to interact, and get some great expressions. Then tweak again, and repeat. You’ll get a ton of variety, without having to worry about thinking up a completely different pose for each shot.

Today we’re going to look how to use this idea with standing poses and a couple. Standing works in pretty much every situation, is comfortable, and has roughly a billion different setups possible, so it’s a great place to start!

Eventually you’ll put together different simple setups like standing, sitting, and lying down. Then you’ll get mega variety!

First, the most basic setup: standing side by side, holding hands, facing their bodies to the camera, looking at the camera.

Read More…

via Standing Posing Guide.

 
Comments Off on Standing Posing Guide

Posted by on March 26, 2012 in Inspiration, Portraiture, Technique, Tutes & Tips, Worth a Look

 

Tags: ,

Stress Free Posing: Sitting Edition | Photography Concentrate

Alrighty! Last time on Stress Free Posing we went through some standing poses for a couple, now let’s take a peek at some easy ways to create natural sitting poses.

The basic idea here is the same: start with one option, then make small changes to the way they’re sitting, looking at each other, and holding each other. Excellent variety + minimal work = maximum fun.

Let’s discuss a couple quick points about sitting before we dive in.

First off, sitting a great equalizer, height wise. It brings both heads to roughly the same level, allowing for more interaction. If you have a really tall guy, and a much shorter gal, sitting poses are going to be your go-to option.

It can also be very flattering when you shoot your subjects from a slightly elevated position (it lengthens out the neck, gets rid of double chins, and opens the eyes up a bit more). This is super easy to do when your couple is sitting, so take advantage of that.

Finally, if you’re going to be sitting in a field, or working with a bride, bring something to sit on. A small blanket works well, as you can hid it if you don’t want it to be in the photo. Or, if you use a Shootsac, just pull off the cover with a flourish and let them sit on that—you get awesome points when you do that.

Read more…

via Stress Free Posing: Sitting Edition | Photography Concentrate.

 
Comments Off on Stress Free Posing: Sitting Edition | Photography Concentrate

Posted by on March 26, 2012 in Inspiration, Portraiture, Technique, Tutes & Tips, Worth a Look

 

Tags: ,

Pet Photography Tips – Photographing Pets for Portraits

If you have the opportunity, it’s best to take some pet photos with the needs of a portrait specially in mind. For some pets, a beautiful photograph capturing their best qualities is very easy, while for others it is frustratingly elusive. Many choose a professional pet photography studio for this reason, and while this can be a good solution, with a little preparation and plenty of patience you should still be able to achieve similar results yourself. After all…who else knows your pet better?

Above all, remember to have fun and don’t be in a rush. Patience is most definitely a virtue when it comes to photographing pets! Be ready to click away and take plenty of shots. Here are a few simple yet effective tips I’ve found can give the best results…

LIGHTING:

The best possible lighting is achieved outside in natural light. Try to do this even if your pet is an indoor only pet – though of course safety comes first and this may not always be possible. Having your pet close to a large window, with plenty of natural light coming from behind or slightly to the side of you as you face your pet, is the next best option.

Avoid direct sunlight, as it can alter natural colouring and increase the contrast between shadow and light, hiding some features. A bright but overcast day is perfect.

Don’t use a flash, as this can cause red-eye and distort the true colouring & shading of your pet. An exception to this is if your pet has a black coat, in which case a flash or bright sunlight can actually bring out shading and texture which may be lost in photos taken under other lighting conditions.

POSITIONING:

Photograph your pet on their level. Don’t have them looking up at you unless this is how you wish the portrait to appear. Don’t make them come to you. Instead, go to where they are most comfortable and see the world from their point of view. Sit on the grass, lie on the floor, whatever it takes. This is especially important for full body shots, which look best from the side rather than above.

Take plenty of facial photographs with a zoom lense if possible, and have their face fill the frame while still in sharp focus. Try taking some three-quarter views as well as from the front, as a slightly angled pose can sometimes make a beautiful portrait photograph.

If your pet will not sit still, have someone hold them in position. If these pictures are solely for the portrait, then hands and arms in the frame do not matter and are easily removed as long as they do not cover important markings.

PERSONALITY:

Keep your pet as comfortable and at ease as possible. Cameras can be distracting for some animals, so if you cannot get your pet to behave normally, try having someone else present to divert their attention and keep them engaged.

Capture the most characteristic expression & pose of your pet. If they are generally happy, try to catch them doing their version of a smile.

A good idea is to have favourite treats or toys at the ready. Hold them up near the camera to catch (and hopefully hold) interest in the right direction. Most importantly, don’t be afraid to be silly. Try making funny and unusual noises or movements to get their attention.

via Pet Photography Tips – Photographing Pets for Portraits.

 
Comments Off on Pet Photography Tips – Photographing Pets for Portraits

Posted by on January 18, 2012 in Portraiture, Worth a Look

 

Tags: ,

100 Photography Tips Infographic – Expert Photography

Welcome to ExpertPhotography’s top 100 photography tips, picked from the best tutorials of 2011, and brought together in one place, for your ease. These tips are extracts from a variety of to the tutorials, where you’ll find much more information, to help you improve your photography. Here are the tutorials that the tips came from:

10 Tips For Better Portraits

10 Steps To Taking Better Photos

10 Top Tips To Taking Sharper Photos

10 Tips For Taking Better Candid Photos

10 Embarrassing Mistakes I Made As A Beginner Photographer

10 Ways To Critique A Photo

10 Reasons Your Photos Suck

10 Reasons Why Being A Photographer Sucks

Top 10 Photography Clichés You Should Avoid To Improve Your Photography

10 Accessories To Improve Your Photography

via 100 Photography Tips Infographic – Expert Photography.

 

Understanding Flash Photography

Caroline lighting setup

Image by Serge Van Cauwenbergh via Flickr

Although this video contains an advertisement for a specific brand, I’ve included it here because it describes and explains how our shutter and flashes work together in a very succinct way. These two factors really emphasise how limited your camera is when using flash, and some tricks to overcome it. I’m sure you’ll find something of interest to you in this video 🙂

So did you learn anything? I did!

 

Tags: , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: