RSS

Wondering what filter to use? | Camera House

Wondering what filter to use?

by CameraHouse

Including a filter or two in your kit can change the look and feel of your photos for the better.

Whether you’re shooting digital or film, you’ll find that if you begin to incorporate the use of filters into your photography you’ll achieve much more professional results. Polarising and neutral density filters or even colour converters are useful additions for any photo enthusiast’s camera kit ( though a lot of colour correction can be done via white balance with a digital camera). Still, you’ll be surprised how the addition of filters can make an image look much more natural as they help your camera to compensate between the way your eye processes an image, to how your camera sees it… This is the reason that most snapshots lack the look and feel of reality. Your camera simply doesn’t process or see things the way your brain does. Similarly, the use of a filter can help you cheat with the look and feel that you want – say by bumping up the colours on an overly bright day or when shooting in the midday sun.

Here’s a rundown on some basic filters that will help you achieve better looking photos.

POLARISING FILTERS

A blue yellow polarising lens is great for picking up the depth of blue in the sky while also adding a much warmer tone to any earth colours in your image. It’s particularly useful when shooting at high contrast times of day such as midday – although its best to avoid using these on an ultra wide angle lens as the sky varies too much and your image can wind up looking a little weird. Also don’t forget a polarising filter will reduce the light entering your camera by 1-3 stops, so bear this in mind when taking your shot.

YELLOW FILTERS

Absolutely essential if you plan on shooting B&W film. A yellow filter will help you avoid overexposed skies and generally kicks up the tone in your photos, making them look much crisper to the naked eye.

PURPLE FILTERS

Our quest to be green friendly has a down side – fluorescent globes seem to be everywhere these days – which are an anathema to a shooter thanks to the hideous green cast they seem to give to any humans within a few feet of them. What’s the answer to avoiding that green-tinged hue? A purple filter. Presto! No one looks like the Wicked Witch of the West any more.

NEUTRAL DENSITY FILTERS

Popular with landscape shooters the world over, neutral density filters are available in solid or graduated formats and suppress the amount of ambient light coming into your camera. A graduated ND filter is great for enhancing detail in the foreground whilst assisting you in avoiding over exposing your background. Therefore it’s particularly effective when shooting land and seascapes. A graduated ND filter is great for this purpose as the colour of the filter fades from dark to light and can be manipulated to suit the area of your image requiring correction.

INFRARED FILTERS

Popular with shooters who like to experiment with monochrome, the infrared filter filters out all wavelengths apart from red and infrared. The result is a blood red image that can look spectacular.

UV FILTERS

Most popular with SLR shooters, UV filters not only protect your lens from everyday scratches and grime, they also reduce the effect of haze or UV scattering – so they can be particularly useful when shooting on water. However the grime they are meant to protect your lens from can just as easily wind up deposited on the filter, so be sure to clean thoroughly before use.

via Wondering what filter to use? | Camera House.

 
Comments Off on Wondering what filter to use? | Camera House

Posted by on February 9, 2012 in Filters, Inspiration, Technique, Tutes & Tips, Worth a Look

 

Tags: , ,

Must-Have Filters for Landscape Photography

Must-Have Filters for Landscape Photography

By Nasim Mansurov

While I was photographing the beautiful scenery of the Glacier National Park at sunrise, I realized that some filters are pretty much required to get good results when photographing landscapes. While many photographers think that some of the built-in tools in Lightroom and Photoshop can simulate filter behavior, making filters redundant in the digital age, some filters in fact can never be simulated in software, while others help in getting even better results in post-processing. If you do not know what filters are and what they are used for, I highly recommend reading my “lens filters explained” article before you continue to read this one.

1) Polarizing Filter

B+W Circular Polarizing Filter

A polarizing filter is a must-have tool for landscape photography. It is typically the first filter landscape photographers buy to instantly improve their pictures and and add vividness and contrast to them. A polarizer can reduce reflections from objects such as water and glass and can be used to darken the sky, bring out the clouds and even reduce atmospheric haze, making the scene look much more vivid. For all normal lenses that have a filter thread in the front, you can get a circular polarizing filter, also known as a “circular polarizer”. A circular polarizer is very easy to use and once you attach it on the front of your lens, all you need to do is rotate it clockwise or counter-clockwise to get a different amount of polarization. Polarizing filters work by blocking certain light waves from entering the lens. Rotating a polarizer allows certain types of light waves to pass through, while blocking other ranges of light waves. Thus, you could turn a sky from light blue to very dark blue or increase/decrease reflections by simply rotating the filter.

The effect of polarization cannot be reproduced or simulated in post-processing, especially when dealing with natural reflections. Take a look at the below image:

Read more about Neutral Density Filters and more via Must-Have Filters for Landscape Photography.

 
Comments Off on Must-Have Filters for Landscape Photography

Posted by on January 27, 2012 in HDR, Landscape, Post Processing, Technique, Tutes & Tips, Worth a Look

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

How to properly resize images in Photoshop

How to properly resize images in Photoshop

By Nasim Mansurov

If you like sharing your photographs online, whether on Facebook or on your own blog, you should learn how to properly resize your images. While your camera can take very high resolution photographs, it is always a good idea to down-size or “down-sample” those images, not only because most websites won’t accept large images, but also because making those images smaller will actually make them look better, if done correctly. In this quick tutorial, I will show you the proper way to resize images in Photoshop. I have seen people employ all kinds of different techniques when it comes to resizing images in Photoshop. The below method is how I personally do it and it has been working great for me, at least based on your feedback. You can employ this technique to any photograph – whether it is a portrait or a sweeping landscape.

When I wrote about the benefits of a high-resolution sensor, I used the word “down-sampling” when talking about reducing noise and increasing sharpness in high-resolution images. Right after I posted the article, I got plenty of questions from our readers, asking about what the down-sampling process is like and how it can be done. I then realized that many photographers are used to the term “resizing” and have never heard of the term “down-sampling” before. I often use the word “down-sampling”, because “resizing” applies to both increasing and decreasing image resolution (and hence its size), while “down-sampling” only applies to reducing an image.

Read more via How to properly resize images in Photoshop.

 
Comments Off on How to properly resize images in Photoshop

Posted by on January 27, 2012 in General, Post Processing, Technique, Tutes & Tips, Worth a Look

 

Tags: ,

Macro photography tips with example photographs and images

Macro photography tips with example photographs and images

by Tanya Puntti

Macro photography tips, images and photographs

Shown below is a set of 10 amazing macro photographs. Each photograph includes an explanation of the camera equipment that was used and tips on how it was taken. While many of the images have been taken with a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro lens, the settings can be reproduced with any real macro lens. You’ll aslo notice they were photographed with an entry level DLSR camera from quite a few years back now! My point being, anyone with a DSLR camera can shoot awesome macro photographs.Click on each image to see a larger version of the photograph.

1. Hoverfly in flightmacro example of a hoverfly insect in flight

Photograph of a hoverfly in flight was taken with a Canon 400D SLR entry level camera, a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro lens and a Canon Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX flash.

Exposure shutter speed: 0.005 sec 1/200
Aperture: f/11
Focal Length: 100 mm
ISO Speed: 200
Exposure Program: Manual
Metering Mode: Pattern

Macro photography tip #1: If possible, use a ring flash or twin lite flash when shooting macro. It will allow you to shoot at a reasonable speed, yet enable you to keep the aperture on a high f/11 for sufficient depth of field. Of course, I understand it isn’t always possible for fellow DSLR photographers to purchase such equipment. No problem, keep reading for other tips.

via Macro photography tips with example photographs and images.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on January 25, 2012 in Flash Photos, Inspiration, Macro, Worth a Look

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Pet Photography Tips – Photographing Pets for Portraits

If you have the opportunity, it’s best to take some pet photos with the needs of a portrait specially in mind. For some pets, a beautiful photograph capturing their best qualities is very easy, while for others it is frustratingly elusive. Many choose a professional pet photography studio for this reason, and while this can be a good solution, with a little preparation and plenty of patience you should still be able to achieve similar results yourself. After all…who else knows your pet better?

Above all, remember to have fun and don’t be in a rush. Patience is most definitely a virtue when it comes to photographing pets! Be ready to click away and take plenty of shots. Here are a few simple yet effective tips I’ve found can give the best results…

LIGHTING:

The best possible lighting is achieved outside in natural light. Try to do this even if your pet is an indoor only pet – though of course safety comes first and this may not always be possible. Having your pet close to a large window, with plenty of natural light coming from behind or slightly to the side of you as you face your pet, is the next best option.

Avoid direct sunlight, as it can alter natural colouring and increase the contrast between shadow and light, hiding some features. A bright but overcast day is perfect.

Don’t use a flash, as this can cause red-eye and distort the true colouring & shading of your pet. An exception to this is if your pet has a black coat, in which case a flash or bright sunlight can actually bring out shading and texture which may be lost in photos taken under other lighting conditions.

POSITIONING:

Photograph your pet on their level. Don’t have them looking up at you unless this is how you wish the portrait to appear. Don’t make them come to you. Instead, go to where they are most comfortable and see the world from their point of view. Sit on the grass, lie on the floor, whatever it takes. This is especially important for full body shots, which look best from the side rather than above.

Take plenty of facial photographs with a zoom lense if possible, and have their face fill the frame while still in sharp focus. Try taking some three-quarter views as well as from the front, as a slightly angled pose can sometimes make a beautiful portrait photograph.

If your pet will not sit still, have someone hold them in position. If these pictures are solely for the portrait, then hands and arms in the frame do not matter and are easily removed as long as they do not cover important markings.

PERSONALITY:

Keep your pet as comfortable and at ease as possible. Cameras can be distracting for some animals, so if you cannot get your pet to behave normally, try having someone else present to divert their attention and keep them engaged.

Capture the most characteristic expression & pose of your pet. If they are generally happy, try to catch them doing their version of a smile.

A good idea is to have favourite treats or toys at the ready. Hold them up near the camera to catch (and hopefully hold) interest in the right direction. Most importantly, don’t be afraid to be silly. Try making funny and unusual noises or movements to get their attention.

via Pet Photography Tips – Photographing Pets for Portraits.

 
Comments Off on Pet Photography Tips – Photographing Pets for Portraits

Posted by on January 18, 2012 in Portraiture, Worth a Look

 

Tags: ,

100 Photography Tips Infographic – Expert Photography

Welcome to ExpertPhotography’s top 100 photography tips, picked from the best tutorials of 2011, and brought together in one place, for your ease. These tips are extracts from a variety of to the tutorials, where you’ll find much more information, to help you improve your photography. Here are the tutorials that the tips came from:

10 Tips For Better Portraits

10 Steps To Taking Better Photos

10 Top Tips To Taking Sharper Photos

10 Tips For Taking Better Candid Photos

10 Embarrassing Mistakes I Made As A Beginner Photographer

10 Ways To Critique A Photo

10 Reasons Your Photos Suck

10 Reasons Why Being A Photographer Sucks

Top 10 Photography Clichés You Should Avoid To Improve Your Photography

10 Accessories To Improve Your Photography

via 100 Photography Tips Infographic – Expert Photography.

 

RAW vs JPEG (JPG) – The Ultimate Visual Guide tutorial

RAW vs JPEG (JPG) – The Ultimate Visual Guide

October 2, 2010

RAW vs JPEG (JPG) The Ultimate Visual Guide

Overview

Shooting RAW vs JPEG is a question that every photographer faces at some point. There are many articles out there that cover the topic from the basics of size and quality, to all of the advanced technical details regarding color bits per channel, compression, firmware DCT processing, etc.

So, here is the disclaimer, if you want the technical details regarding RAW vs JPEGs, Digital Photography School has a great technical primer discussing the basic technical differences, a brief Google search will also unearth loads of additional more in depth technical resources as well.

This article is designed to teach you the differences between RAW and JPEG (JPG) from a pragmatic real world point of view. Thus, we will be using a lot of actual image examples to help show the exact concrete differences. In addition, we are going to leave out most of the technical mumbo jumbo that won’t really help you beyond being exceptionally proficient at speaking “nerd.”

via RAW vs JPEG (JPG) – The Ultimate Visual Guide tutorial.

 
Comments Off on RAW vs JPEG (JPG) – The Ultimate Visual Guide tutorial

Posted by on January 12, 2012 in Featured, General, Technique, Tutes & Tips, Worth a Look

 

Tags: , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: